Availability

Once we have received your reservation/inquiry, the availability status will be send to you via email as soon as possible.
  • HAN - Double Room

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    Max:
    Price from:
    N$ 2,330
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    Including breakfast
    This rate is valid until 31.10.2017

  • HAN - Single Room

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    Max:
    Price from:
    N$ 1,649
    Select dates

    Including breakfast
    This rate is valid until 31.10.2017

General

Hansa Hotel- What you’d never expect in the world’s oldest desert, Namibia’s finest and oldest Hotel.

The Hansa Hotel – nestling in the very center of the charming little town of Swakopmund, wrapped in the shape of a timelessly classical building dating from 1905, and integral part of Swakopmund’s architectural heritage, offers you a feeling of being enveloped in a luxurious and sophisticated hospitality with a satisfying blend of both classic atmosphere and truly elegant interior, matched with friendly and personalized service.

Accommodation: At the Hansa Hotel, we pride ourselves on providing only the finest,  most luxurious accommodation. The Hotel boasts 5 Family units, 4 Suites and 49 Twin/Double rooms.  Each room is individually decorated and fitted with under tile or under carpet heating,
15 satellite television/radio channels, direct dialling telephones, hairdryer, safes, coffee/tea facilities and en-suite bath/showers.

Restuarant & Bar: For those who can’t live on aesthetics alone, the hotel offers two world-class restaurants.   Breakfast and dinner is served in our Main Dining room where seafood and game specialities are on offer from our world renowned kitchen.

The Terrace
“Overlooking our inner gardens”
Lunch is served on the terrace and features daily specials.  It also overlooks the inner garden area and seats approximately 60 people.
This area can also be utilized for cocktail parties and receptions.

The Bar
“A tranquil, cozy and relaxed atmosphere”

If it’s not food you’re after, the Private Bar offers a warm fireplace on winter nights and a cozy atmosphere as the fog rolls in.
The private Lounge offers another escape for guests looking to recline with their favorite book or host a private party.

Check-in time

14:00

Check-out time

10:00

Children and extra beds

Please inform us of children traveling along and their requirements.

Cancellation / Prepayment

Payment: All prices are inclusive of VAT at 15% in Namibian Dollar (N$). Payment in approved currency will be accepted at the rate of exchange of the bankers of Namibia Reservations CC at the time of the receipt of payment. Any shortfall resulting in exchange fluctuations will be for the account of the customer. Payment must be made 60 days prior to arrival, whereupon a due date for the payment will be given, and can be made by electronic transfer, credit card (VISA and MASTER card are both accepted). Cancellations: Policy Any cancellation of bookings made between 60 to 45 days prior to arrival will result in a 20% cancellation fee of the total cost. Any cancellation of bookings made between 44 to 30 days prior to arrival will result in a 40% cancellation fee of the total cost Any cancellation of bookings made between 29 to 14 days prior to arrival will result in a 70% cancellation fee of the total cost Any cancellation of bookings made between 13 to 0 days prior to arrival will result in a 100% cancellation fee of the total cost 100% of the total cost for any non-arrival.

Facilities

  • Air Condition
  • Airport Shuttle Service
  • Bar
  • Free toiletries
  • Hairdryer
  • Heating
  • Laundry
  • Lounge
  • Minibar
  • Outdoor pool
  • Private bathroom
  • Restaurant
  • Seating area
  • Wake up service
  • WiFi

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Swakopmund

Swakopmund

Swakopmund is Namibia playground, a holiday destination for tourists and locals alike looking to escape the heat of the interior and to have a little adventure.

The city itself resembles a small German town and manages to create a feeling of timelessness with its palm-lined streets, seaside promenades, restaurants, cafes, art galleries and museums. And while there is plenty to do within city limits, the real action happens in the desert surrounding Swakopmund. Quad-biking, sand-boarding, sand-skiing, parasailing and dozens of other guided adrenaline inducing activities are available by reservation from many of the adventure companies operating in the area. At Walvis Bay, visitors can join a dolphin cruise or explore the lagoon on a kayak tour.

Even with all this excitement Swakopmund serves as a good break during a busy vacation. Relax and have fun in a place well suited for both.

Culture and history info

Captain Curt von François founded Swakopmund in 1892 as the main harbour for the Imperial German colony—The deep sea harbour at Walvis Bay belonged to the British. The founding date was on August 8 when the crew of gunboat Hyäne erected two beacons on the shore. Swakopmund was chosen for its availability of fresh water, and because other sites further north such as Cape Cross were found unsuitable. The site did, however, not offer any natural protection to ships lying off the coast, a geographical feature not often found along Namibia's coast. When the first 120 Schutztruppe soldiers and 40 settlers were offloaded at Swakopmund, they had to dig caves into the sand for shelter. The offloading was done by Kru tribesmen from Liberia who used special boats. Woermann-Linie, the operator of the shipping route to Germany, employed 600 Kru at that time. Swakopmund Lighthouse Swakopmund quickly became the main port for imports and exports for the whole territory, and was one of six towns which received municipal status in 1909. Many government offices for German South-West Africa had offices in Swakopmund. During the Herero Wars a concentration camp for Herero people was operated in town. Inmates were forced into slave labour; approximately 2,000 Herero died. Soon, the harbour created by the Mole silted up, and in 1905 work was started on a wooden jetty, but in the long run this was inadequate. In 1914 construction of a steel jetty was therefore commenced, the remains of which can still be seen today. After World War I it became a pedestrian walkway. It was declared structurally unsound and was closed to the public for seven years, and in 2006 renovations to the portion supported by concrete pillars were completed, with a seafood restaurant and sushi bar being added to the end portion of the steel portion of the jetty soon after. A new timber walkway was also added onto the existing steel structure, and the steel portion of the jetty reopened to the public in late 2010. Woermann House & Tower Trading and shipping companies founded branches in Swakopmund. A number of these buildings still exist today. After German South-West Africa was taken over by the Union of South Africa in 1915, all harbour activities were transferred from Swakopmund to Walvis Bay. Many of the Central Government services ceased. Businesses closed down, the number of inhabitants diminished, and the town became less prosperous. However, the natural potential of Swakopmund as a holiday resort was recognised, and this potential has subsequently been developed. Today tourism-related services form an important part of the town's economy. The Swakopmund Skydiving Club has operated from Swakopmund Airport since its founding in 1972. Swakopmund Jetty The discovery of uranium at Rössing, 70 km (43 mi) outside the town, led to the development of the world's largest opencast uranium mine. This had an enormous impact on all facets of life in Swakopmund which necessitated expansion of the infrastructure of the town to make it into one of the most modern in Namibia. After Namibian independence from South Africa in 1990 many street names were changed from their original German, or in some cases, Afrikaans names, to honour (mostly black) Namibians. For example, in 2001, then-president of Namibia Sam Nujoma renamed the main street (Kaiser-Wilhelm-Straße) Sam Nujoma Avenue in honour of himself.[8] In October 2000, an agreement was signed between the Namibian and People's Republic of China governments to build a satellite tracking station at Swakopmund. Construction was completed in July 2001 at a site north of Swakopmund to the east of the Henties Bay-Swakopmund road and opposite the Swakopmund Salt Works. The site was chosen as it was on the orbital track of a manned spacecraft during its re-entry phase. Costing N$12 million, the complex covers 150m by 85m. It is equipped with five metre and nine metre satellite dishes. In August 2008, filming commenced in Swakopmund on the AMC television series The Prisoner starring Jim Caviezel and Sir Ian McKellen. Swakopmund was used as the film location for The Village.
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