Availability

Once we have received your reservation/inquiry, the availability status will be send to you via email as soon as possible.
  • HT - Double Room

    + more info
    Max:
    Price from:
    N$ 2,220
    Select dates

    Including Breakfast
    This Rate is valid till 31.10.2018

  • HT - Single Room

    + more info
    Max:
    Price from:
    N$ 1,602
    Select dates

    Including Breakfast
    This Rate is valid till 31.10.2018

General

Hotel Thule is a mythical place where the real and the imaginary meet at the top of a mountain, according to Nordic legend. Hotel Thule, true to this legend, offers a breath-taking panorama view of the capital city of Windhoek and the surrounding mountains. Hotel Thule welcomes local and international guests alike, offering modern, spacious accommodation, and an excellent restaurant, making it the perfect venue for weddings, seminars & conferences and other events.

Hotel Thule offers 25 spacious rooms, all individually refurbished with modern finishing touches. The rooms are fully airconditioned, and equipped with a tea and coffee station, a mini bar, a safe, satellite television, and en suite bathrooms with both bath and shower. For the business traveller, a work space, plus wireless connectivity is available.

Enjoying a meal in our On the Edge Restaurant or on our Terrace overlooking the city of Windhoek, is one of the highlights of a visit to Hotel Thule. Breakfast, with the sun casting its first rays over the city, is a good start to the day, whilst dinner – enjoyed in the ambiance of our Restaurant and the city lights twinkling in the dark, is the perfect way to end a day in Windhoek. Hotel Thulle offers a continental as well as a full English breakfast, a wide selection of teas, freshly brewed coffee and fruit juices. Our A La Carte menu is renowned for its selection of carefully prepared dishes, featuring a blend of Namibian and international cuisine. If enjoying a Sundowner on the Terrace, our snack menu is a popular choice. Our wine list offers a hand-picked selection of wines, perfect to accompany your meal of choice.

Check-in time

14:00

Check-out time

10:00

Children and extra beds

Please inform us of children traveling along and their requirements.

Cancellation / Prepayment

Payment: All prices are inclusive of VAT at 15% in Namibian Dollar (N$). Payment in approved currency will be accepted at the rate of exchange of the bankers of Namibia Reservations CC at the time of the receipt of payment. Any shortfall resulting in exchange fluctuations will be for the account of the customer. Payment must be made 60 days prior to arrival, whereupon a due date for the payment will be given, and can be made by electronic transfer, credit card (VISA and MASTER card are both accepted). Cancellations: Policy Any cancellation of bookings made between 60 to 45 days prior to arrival will result in a 20% cancellation fee of the total cost. Any cancellation of bookings made between 44 to 30 days prior to arrival will result in a 40% cancellation fee of the total cost Any cancellation of bookings made between 29 to 14 days prior to arrival will result in a 70% cancellation fee of the total cost Any cancellation of bookings made between 13 to 0 days prior to arrival will result in a 100% cancellation fee of the total cost 100% of the total cost for any non-arrival.

Facilities

  • Air Condition
  • Bar
  • Desk
  • Lounge
  • Minibar
  • Outdoor pool
  • Private bathroom
  • Restaurant
  • Safety Deposit Box
  • Telephone
  • TV
  • WiFi

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Windhoek

Windhoek

Windhoek is the capital and largest city of the Republic of Namibia. It is located in central Namibia in the Khomas Highland plateau area, at around 1,700 metres (5,600 ft) above sea level. The population of Windhoek in 2012 was 322,500 and grows continually due to an influx from all over Namibia.

The town developed at the site of a permanent spring known to the indigenous pastoral communities. It developed rapidly after Jonker Afrikaner, Captain of the Orlam settled here in 1840 and built a stone church for his community. However, in the decades thereafter multiple wars and hostilities led to the neglect and destruction of the new settlement such that Windhoek was founded a second time in 1890 by Imperial German army Major Curt von François.

Windhoek is the social, economic, political, and cultural centre of the country. Nearly every Namibian national enterprise, governmental body, educational and cultural institution is headquartered there.

Culture and history info

Etymology The City of Windhoek is traditionally known by two names: ǀAiǁGams, (Khoekhoe: hot springs) and Otjomuise (Otjiherero: place of steam). Both traditional names reference the hot springs near today's city centre. Theories vary on how the place got its modern name of Windhoek. Most believe it is derived from the Afrikaans word Wind-Hoek (wind corner). Another theory suggests that Captain Jonker Afrikaner named Windhoek after the Winterhoek Mountains at Tulbagh in South Africa, where his ancestors had lived. The first mention of the name Windhoek occurred in a letter from Jonker Afrikaner to Joseph Tindall, dated 12 August 1844. Pre-colonial Around 1840, Jonker Afrikaner established a settlement at Windhoek. He and his followers stayed near one of the main hot springs, located in the present-day Klein Windhoek suburb. He built a stone church that held 500 people, which was also used as a school. Two Rhenish missionaries, Carl Hugo Hahn and Franz Heinrich Kleinschmidt, started working there in late 1842 and were two years later driven out by two Wesleyans, Richard Haddy and Joseph Tindall. Gardens were laid out and for a while Windhoek prospered, but wars between the Nama and Herero eventually destroyed the settlement. After a long absence, Hahn visited Windhoek again in 1873 and was dismayed to see that nothing remained of the town's former prosperity. In June 1885, a Swiss botanist found only jackals and starving guinea fowl amongst neglected fruit trees. Colonial era Windhoek at the end of the 19th century Stamps for German South West Africa postmarked Windhuk Sanderburg, one of the three castles of Windhoek In 1878, Britain annexed Walvis Bay and incorporated it into the Cape of Good Hope in 1884, but Britain did not extend its influence into the hinterland. A request by merchants from Lüderitzbucht resulted in the declaration of a German protectorate over German South-West Africa in 1884. The German colony came into being with the determination of its borders in 1890 and Germany sent a protective corps, called the Schutztruppe under Major Curt von François, to maintain order. Von François stationed his garrison at Windhoek, which was strategically situated as a buffer between the Nama and Herero, while the twelve strong springs provided water for the cultivation of food. Present-day Windhoek was founded on 18 October 1890, when Von François fixed the foundation stone of the fort, which is now known as the Alte Feste (Old Fortress). After 1907, development accelerated as people migrated from the countryside to the city. There was also a larger influx of European settlers arriving from Germany and South Africa. Businesses were erected on Kaiser Street (presently Independence Avenue), and along the dominant mountain ridge over the city. At this time, Windhoek's three castles, Heinitzburg, Sanderburg, and Schwerinsburg, were built. South African administration after World War I The German colonial era came to an end during World War I when South African troops occupied Windhoek in May 1915 on behalf of the British Empire. For the next five years, a military government administered South West Africa. Development of the city of Windhoek and the nation later to be known as Namibia came to a virtual standstill. After World War II, Windhoek's development gradually gained momentum, as more capital became available to improve the area's economic climate. After 1955, large public projects were undertaken, such as the building of new schools and hospitals, tarring of the city's roads (a project begun in 1928 with Kaiser Street), and the building of dams and pipelines to finally stabilise the water supply. It also introduced the World's first potable re-use plant in 1958, treating recycled sewage and sending it directly into the town's water supply. Since Namibian independence With Namibia's independence from South African administration in 1990, Windhoek was recognised as the capital city of South-West Africa as administered by the South African government. It continues to be the capital city of the Republic of Namibia, as well as the provincial capital of the central Khomas Region. Since then the city experienced accelerated growth and development.
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